Sticky Branding: Tagline Tips from an Olde Wordsmith

By | Branding, Marketing

Sticky ShakespeareKnock knock!
Who’s there?
Will.
Will Who?
Will you please take taglines seriously!

It was 1606 when Shakespeare wrote “Knock knock! Who’s there?”, and that catchy bit of dialogue from Macbeth has stuck in our collective English-speaking consciousness ever since. Sometime later it was co-opted for humor, and so began the silly “knock knock” joke convention we all know well.

Shakespeare did not write taglines for commerce as we know them today, but employing some of his formidable wordsmithing techniques can boost the fortunes of any brand or business. Read More

The Art of Website Clean Up

By | Communication, Website Design

web-cleanup

Spring arrived on March 20th, and with it the traditional reminder that it’s time to think about cleaning. Just like your closet or garage, a website accumulates stuff. Content and pages get added. Important messages get buried. Navigation stops making sense. Certain pages you hope nobody finds. Somewhere along the way, while everyone was just busy doing their jobs, the website hit a tipping point into clutter. Now you don’t even want to visit your own website.

Avoidance is always appealing, especially if the home page looks decent on a cursory visit. But nice colors and graphics can’t provide a good user experience if the underlying logic has fallen apart (or never existed to begin with). Disorder never fixes itself. If we had to choose, the brain of a website is more important than a pretty interface. Read More

A Law Firm Name Can Be a Liability

By | Branding, Communication, Law, Logos, Marketing, Naming

name-badge_llp2

Recently we visited the website of a Big Law firm with a great nickname. As we typed in their clever url, we wondered, will the website live up to the promise of their fresh, unconventional moniker? Sadly, no. From the look of their tired logo, which featured the full legal firm name complete with requisite ampersand, it could have been 1955 (had the internet existed). The website verbiage proclaimed the firm to be “creative and innovative”, but the branding blared “traditional and sedate”. Read More

Smart Companies with Stupid Logos

By | Branding, Design, Logos

Stupid Logo

Some companies go boldly about their business despite having an embarrassingly bad logo, like the investment bank that looks like a fast food restaurant or the law firm that looks like a feminine hygiene product. You have to wonder, do they not know how ridiculous they look? Or do they know, but just not care?

Back before business migrated online and our attention spans shrank to nanoseconds, snap judgments based on appearance were perhaps a little less likely. But now, an ugly, outdated or inappropriate company logo makes many people mentally swipe left.

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Musings Inspired by a Marketing Maven

By | Branding, Communication, Design, Marketing

“The more technologically advanced our society becomes, the more we need to go back to the basic fundamentals of human communication.” Angela Ahrendts

Burberry Apple

Can you compare apples to raincoats? Tim Cook thought so when he hired Angela Ahrendts from Burberry last year to bring some of her marketing mojo to Apple as VP of Retail. While CEO of Burberry, she was renowned for her anticipation of market changes and sharp strategizing, as well as her ability to connect with employees, customers, creative people and the fashion community. Read More

Effects of Visual and Verbal Presentation on Cognitive Load

By | Advertising, Communication, Design

visual_verbal_blog

We been known to get ideas from scientific research. While looking for inspiration during the process of designing our new website, we came across a paper from Stanford that explained how what we do helps clients communicate with their audience better. Here’s an excerpt:

“Extensive research has shown that having two mental representations for something, notably, both visual and verbal, is better for memory than having one. If one internal representation is lost or corrupted, the other can compensate. Read More